Philippine dating tradition

The suitor stops the courtship if he is quite sure that the woman does not reciprocate.

But once the female encourages the suitor to continue, the "teasing stage" comes to a close and a "serious stage" of Philippine courtship begins.

It is within this stage where the couple engages in a series of group dates, chaperoned dates, The couple later on decides to come out into the open and reveals the status of their relationship to family members, relatives, and friends.

The serious suitor or boyfriend visits the family of the woman he admires/courts or girlfriend in order to formally introduce himself, particularly to the lady's parents.

With regards to the engagement and pre-marriage stages, Filipino tradition dictates that the man and his parents perform the pamamanhikan (literally, a Tagalog word that means "to go up the stairs of the house" of the girlfriend and her parents; pamamanhikan is known as tampa or danon to the Ilocanos, as pasaguli to the Palaweños, and as kapamalai to the Maranaos and blessings from her parents in order to marry.

This is when the formal introduction of the man's parents and woman's parents happens.

In the island of Luzon, the Ilocanos also perform serenading, known to them as tapat In reality, Harana is a musical exchange of messages which can be about waiting or loving or just saying no. As the Pamamaalam stage sets in, the suitor sings one last song and the haranistas disappear in the night.

Rooster courtship is also another form of courting in Luzon.

After the courtship process, the Batangueños of Batangas has a peculiar tradition performed on the eve of the wedding.

This serenading practice was an influence adopted by the Filipinos from the Spaniards.

During the courtship process, a traditional Filipina is expected to play "hard to get", to act as if not interested, to be not flirty, and show utmost restraint, modesty, shyness, good upbringing, be well-mannered, demure, and reserved despite having great feelings for her admirer; a behavior culturally considered appropriate while being courted.

The Ifugao of northern Luzon practices a courtship called ca-i-sing (this practice is known as the ebgan to the Kalinga tribes and as pangis to the Tingguian tribes), wherein males and females are separated into "houses".

The house for the Filipino males is called the Ato, while the house for Filipino females is known as the olog or agamang.

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